Vera Roos is a Professor of Psychology at the North-West University since 2004.

She has presented various papers and posters at national and international conferences on topics related to social gerontology with a focus on

  • enabling contexts

  • relational psychology

  • intergenerational relations

  • contributions of older persons in challenged contexts

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peer reviewed papers in national and international journals
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contributed chapters in textbooks

Vera Roos is research professor in the Ageing and Generational Dynamics programme affiliated with the Optentia Research Focus Area at the North-West University’s Vaal Triangle Campus.  Over the past 25 years, she has presented and published nationally and internationally on topics related to relational psychology, intergenerational relations, and older persons’ contributions in challenging contexts.  Vera’s theoretical approach – namely, that broader environments inform dynamic social processes – provided the background for her development of the Mmogo-method®, a visual means of data collection.  Existing relational theories could not satisfactorily explain findings obtained by this method in the study of relational experiences (loneliness, friendships, intergenerational interactions), so she developed a further relational theory, Self-Interactional Group Theory (SIGT).  Vera is committed to promoting the relational and collective wellbeing of older persons and communities within their contextual realities.  Vera Roos is a scientist with a South African National Research Foundation rating.

Psychology

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Current Project

Age-Inclusive ICT Innovation for Service Delivery: A developing country perspective

The book comprises of three parts. Part 1, Context and Project Background, situates the book in the literature relating to the delivery of services to older persons in a developing country, and focuses on the case of South Africa in three chapters. It presents the legislative background and the case of the we-DELIVER community-based project. Chapter 1 contextualises the study within the phenomenon of population ageing and the pressing need to develop information and communication systems (ICT) appropriate for developing countries. Chapter 2 focuses on constitutional rights and legislative frameworks, indicating what ought to be in place to deliver basic and municipal services to older persons; it highlights the gap between that and what actually transpires, drawing on the perspectives of local government officials and older service recipients. Chapter 3 presents the we-DELIVER project as an example of the process of developing age-inclusive ICT (Yabelana) to promote holistic service delivery to older persons in developing-world conditions. Part 2 deal with Principles, Processes, and Applications. In five chapters, we discuss the principles and methods followed and the applications of ICT together with their outcomes. Chapter 4 critically engages with proposed individualised and Eurocentric ethical protocols and their (ir)relevance or even at times harmful application when context is not considered. Chapter 5 presents the processes of developing appropriate age-inclusive quantitative and qualitative data collection tools and data collection application. Chapter 6 presents the findings of a baseline assessment of older South Africans’ mobile phone use across rural, semi-urban and urban settings. These findings were used to guide the development of appropriate ICT (Yabelana), discussed in Chapter 7. Chapter 8 elaborates on the experiences of older persons engaging with younger people for assistance with their use of mobile phones. Part 3, discusses Impact and Sustainability and consists of two chapters. Chapter 9 theoretically grounds and proposes measures to determine impact and sustainability of community-based projects. Drawing on the theory and practice relating to impact and sustainability of such projects, this chapter highlights implications that could mitigate or limit the impact and sustainability of community-based projects centred on the use of ICT and considers the impact and sustainability of the Yabelana ICT solution. Chapter 10 reaches into the future of the sustainability and impact of ICT as tools to assist older persons in accessing the information and services they need.

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Published Articles

Published Book

published a book on the Mmogo-method® in 2016

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Photos

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Vera, Proffs Susan Coetzee-Van Rooy; Linda du Plessis, Isabella Aboderin, Norah Keating, Elri Botha, Ian Rothmann (Snr) and Jaco Hoffman

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Families Workshop Delegates 2013

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ICP 2012 Co-Presenters of Mmogo-Method®

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Vera & Honours Students 2012

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ICP 2012 Group Photo

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UNISA Student Conference 2011

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Mmogo-Method® Materials

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MA research Psychology 2013 Conducting Research

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ICP 2012 Students Presentations

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Vera & Lizanle presenting at IAGG Paris 2009

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Vera & Student Conducting Research

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Vera, Portia & Betty at their Graduation